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A guide to writing an academic paper

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❶This process of relating the object of investigation back to the established criteria is another fundamental component of the body of the essay. Understand that you are writing to a person who is delighted when you make your point clearly, concisely, and persuasively.

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Use the first source bibliographies to make a list of works. Depending upon the number of pages, the list may vary. For an academic paper of less than twenty-five pages, a written or typed list may be as much as necessary. A few academic papers will have a larger number of page count for which you ought to consider building your list in a spreadsheet or word processor table.

After gathering sources, it is ideal to do a first read, which is a quick reading through the article, in order to get a general idea of the subject matter. You should start your first reads earlier than gathering all the sources. This will save time. After short-listing the selected sources, form a thesis statement. A thesis statement can be either a single sentence or a combination of about three to four sentences that will specify points that your academic paper will comprise.

Now, reread your selected sources in details to look for quotable things that support or relate to your thesis statement. Then type in your selected quotes, each with a typed-in comment to yourself of how it speaks about to your thesis statement.

In the next stage, bring together your logical argument systematically and creatively. You can check out for additional details on assembling your paper. This is it, simple as that! Place your order now, and become one happy student! We represent fast-developing and experienced academic writing services that gained numerous followers over the previous years.

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You need to master it, no matter if you study programming, information technologies, web communication, computer science, management, or similar disciplines. The introduction is the first section and starting point of your dissertation where you explain a specific topic, formulate a strong thesis statement, and give an overview of further paragraphs. What is its main purpose? The key goal of any dissertation introduction is to do the following: Professional Academic Writing Services for Students.

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They search detailed clues. In other words, it's important to determine not only what you think about a topic, but also what your audience is likely to think. What are your audience's biases? To whom are you writing, and for what purpose? When you begin to answer all of these questions, you have started to reckon with what has been called "the rhetorical stance.

Let's first consider your relationship to your topic. When you write a paper, you take a stand on a topic. You determine whether you are for or against, passionate or cool-headed. You determine whether you are going to view this topic through a particular perspective feminist, for example , or whether you are going to make a more general response. You also determine whether you are going to analyze your topic through the lens of a particular discipline - history, for example.

Your stance on the topic depends on the many decisions you have made in the reading and thinking processes.

In order to make sure that your stance on a topic is appropriately analytical, you might want to ask yourself some questions. Begin by asking why you've taken this particular stance. Why did you find some elements of the text more important than others? Does this prioritizing reflect some bias or preconception on your part? If you dismissed part of a text as boring or unimportant, why did you do so? Do you have personal issues or experiences that lead you to be impatient with certain claims? Is there any part of your response to the text that might cause your reader to discount your paper as biased or un-critical?

If so, you might want to reconsider your position on your topic. Your position on a topic does not by itself determine your rhetorical stance. You must also consider your reader. In the college classroom, the audience is usually the professor or your classmates - although occasionally your professor will instruct you to write for a more particular or more general audience.

No matter who your reader is, you will want to consider him carefully before you start to write. What do you know about your reader and his stance towards your topic?

What is he likely to know about the topic? What biases is he likely to have? Moreover, what effect do you hope to have on the reader? Is your aim to be controversial? Will the reader appreciate or resent your intention? Once you have determined who your reader is, you will want to consider how you might best reach him. If, for example, you are an authority on a subject and you are writing to readers who know little or nothing about it, then you'll want to take an informative stance.

If you aren't yet confident about a topic, and you have more questions than answers, you might want to take an inquisitive stance. In any case, when you are deciding on a rhetorical stance, choose one that allows you to be sincere. You don't want to take an authoritative stance on a subject if you aren't confident about what you are saying.

On the other hand, you can't avoid taking a position on a subject: What if you are of two minds on a subject? Declare that to the reader. Make ambivalence your clear rhetorical stance. Finally, don't write simply to please your professor. Though some professors find it flattering to discover that all of their students share their positions on a subject, most of us are hoping that your argument will engage us by telling us something new about your topic - even if that "something new" is simply a fresh emphasis on a minor detail.

Moreover, it is impossible for you to replicate the "ideal paper" that exists in your professor's head. When you try, you risk having your analysis compared to your professor's. Do you really want that to happen?

In high school you might have been taught various strategies for structuring your papers. Some of you might have been raised on the five paragraph theme, in which you introduce your topic, come up with three supporting points, and then conclude by repeating what you've already said.

Others of you might have been told that the best structure for a paper is the hour-glass model, in which you begin with a general statement, make observations that are increasingly specific, and then conclude with a statement that is once again general.

When you are writing papers in college, you will require structures that will support ideas that are more complex than the ones you considered in high school. Your professors might offer you several models for structuring your paper. They might tell you to order your information chronologically or spatially, depending on whether you are writing a paper for a history class or a course in art history. Or they may provide you with different models for argument: No prefab model exists that will provide adequate structure for the academic argument.

For more detailed advice on various ways to structure your paper, see Writing: Considering Structure and Organization. When creating an informed argument, you will want to rely on several organizational strategies, but you will want to keep some general advice in mind.

Your introduction should accomplish two things: Often writers will do the latter before they do the former. That is, they will begin by summarizing what other scholars have said about their topic, and then they will declare what they are adding to the conversation. Even when your paper is not a research paper you will be expected to introduce your argument as if into a larger conversation.

For more specific advice on writing a good introduction, see Introductions and Conclusions. Probably you were taught in high school that every paper must have a declared thesis, and that this sentence should appear at the end of the introduction. While this advice is sound, a thesis is sometimes implied rather than declared in a text, and it can appear almost anywhere - if the writer is skillful. Because your thesis is arguably the most important sentence in your paper, you will want to read more about it in Developing Your Thesis.

Because every thesis presents an arguable point, you as a writer are obligated to acknowledge in your paper the other side s of an argument. Consider what your opponents might say against your argument. Then determine where and how you want to deal with the opposition.

Do you want to dismiss the opposition in the first paragraph? Do you want to list each opposing argument and rebut them one by one? Your decisions will determine how you structure your paper. Every convincing argument must have support. Your argument's support will be organized in your paper's paragraphs.

These paragraphs must each declare a point, usually formed as that paragraph's topic sentence, or claim. A topic sentence or claim is like a thesis sentence - except that instead of announcing the argument of the entire paper, it announces the argument of that particular paragraph. In this way, the topic sentence controls the paper's evidence.

The topic sentence is more flexible than the thesis in that it can more readily appear in different places within the paragraph. Most often, however, it appears at or near the beginning. For more information on structuring paragraphs, see Writing: Writing a good conclusion is difficult. You will want to sum up, but you will want to do more than say what you have already said. You will want to leave the reader with something to think about, but you will want to avoid preaching. You might want to point to a new idea or question, but you risk confusing the reader by introducing something that he finds irrelevant.

Writing conclusions is, in part, a matter of finding the proper balance. For more instruction on how to write a good conclusion, see Introductions and Conclusions. You need to be analytical. You need to create an informed argument. You need to consider your relationship to your topic and to your reader. But what about the matter of finding an appropriate academic tone and style? The tone and style of academic writing might at first seem intimidating. But they needn't be. Professors want students to write clearly and intelligently on matters that they, the students, care about.

What professors DON'T want is imitation scholarship - that is, exalted gibberish that no one cares about.

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The first thing that you'll need to understand is that writing in college is for the most part a particular kind of writing, called "academic writing.". While academic writing might be defined in many ways, there are three concepts that you need to understand before you write your first academic paper.

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I keep hearing from college professors that students don’t know how to write well,so here’s a primer for college kids on how to properly write an academic paper.

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Methods of study for conducting academic research and writing an academic paper might differ according to the subject and level of study but the basic structure of academic papers, following remains more or less the same. Citing sources in the body of your paper and providing a list of references as either footnotes or endnotes is a very important aspect of academic writing. It is essential to always acknowledge the source of any ideas, research findings, data, or quoted text that you have used in your paper as a defense against allegations of plagiarism.

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Writing for an academic journal: 10 tips Select two types of paper: one that's the type of paper you can use as a model for yours, and one that you can cite in your paper, thereby joining the. Student Guide to Writing. a High-Quality Academic Paper. Follow these guidelines when writing academic papers, including your Trident University Case and SLP assignments. An effective academic writing style is an essential part of a university.